CareerAnalytics’ Weekly Favorites

Portrait,Of,Woman,With,Cup,Of,Coffee,Reading,Newspaper,At
Portrait,Of,Woman,With,Cup,Of,Coffee,Reading,Newspaper,At

In this weekly article CareerAnalytics scours the deepest parts of the web in search of the most interesting career-related news, so you don’t have to. Every week we create a selection of three news articles about career development and present you with an excerpt of the article that we think is worth sharing. Click on the heading to read the whole article.

1.      How to Break the News to Your Boss That You Don’t Want to Climb the Ladder– Jamie Graceffa, The Muse

“You know why you want to remain exactly where you are: Your job is an optimal fit at this point in your life. It hits on many of the key factors that make you happy and engaged at work, such as having a good relationship with your boss and peers, being fulfilled by the work you do, earning good pay and benefits, etc. You don’t have the desire to move up, but it’s not due to a lack of skills or confidence or drive—you just really like your job as is.”

2. 15 Career Killers And How To Avoid Them – Bryan Robinson, Forbes Magazine

“Some career climbers kick themselves when they lose a promotion or their idea isn’t up to snuff—thinking self-ridicule will help achieve success? Studies show it’s the other way around. Coming down hard on yourself after a setback reduces the chances of rebounding. The solution? When job letdowns leave you disheartened, the last thing you want to do is attack yourself. Extinguish your blame thrower, put down your gavel and chill your faultfinder. Give yourself a pep talk, an affirmation or talk yourself off the ledge with self-compassion.”

3.     Companies are hiring bosses with these qualities for a terrible reason – John Anderer, The Ladders

“Now, a new joint study led by The University of Maryland reports some bad bosses are being placed in positions of power for a specific reason. Study authors say that when a company is in need of “aggressive earnings reports” recruiters and hiring managers are more likely to suggest job candidates with “dark personality traits” who would be willing to inflate or manipulate earnings and income data. .”

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